Webb Review – Bertie Bird And The Chilly Little Snowman By Stacy Bax and Anita King

We absolutely love Christmas books and Bertie Bird and the Chilly Little Snowman is no exception. With beautiful bright illustration by Anita King and the lovely story by Stacy Bax this really is a great book for the holiday season and one that you would enjoy cosying up to read on a cold night.

Poor snowman keeps loosing his nose, luckily he has someone who is watching over him and trying to solve his problems. It is nice that the snowman has a friend because Bertie Bird is a cheeky little robin who both Harrison and I agree, needs to learn to ask before he takes things. It really is sad for the snowman.

The illustrations are enchanting and they make us want snowy days and snowball fights, to make our own snowmen and then snuggle up with hot chocolates. If you are making a story book advent calendar then this should definitely be included, alternatively it would make a great addition to a Christmas Eve box too. It has all the charm of a warm and cosy Christmas story and is laid out beautifully.

Get your copy before Christmas, available now from Shookbop.

We really enjoyed the playful nature of Santa in the book and think you will too. Who decided that a carrot was the correct nose for a snowman anyway? You will have to read the book to see the humorous alternatives.

4 Out of 5 webs.

After a very lengthy discussion Harrison decided that this story deserved 4 out of 5 webs, he really wanted to give it 5 but felt that Bertie Bird took what he needed for a good reason but could of explained himself beforehand so that Snowman didn’t get so sad. I love that this book began a discussion about stealing for the sake of good and about being honest with your intentions. I feel like Harry learnt from the story at the same time as enjoying it.

We gladly received this book for review from the publisher Stour Valley Publishing and the view are all our own.

Thank you for reading,

Samantha and Harrison x

Webb Review – Always Good by Gary Heskins and Kerry Sullivan

Always Good is a full colour children’s book written by Gary Heskins and illustrated by Kerry Sullivan, it is the story of a boy named Bobby Mac who sees the world differently to everyone around him. Teaching that the world is full of more than just material possessions and that you can be happy without all of them. Happily Bobby Mac sees his family as the richest treasure he could have. It is a feel good story with a heart of gold that tries to see the best in not having much.

Bobby has a wonderful family and they have taught him a lot about gratefulness and I think that it is a great lesson especially for children that aren’t in a position to have all of their wants met straight away. For the even children that are lucky enough to have everything, this story teaches to be a little more humble and to look at what really matters in your life.

Harrison and I really enjoyed this book, it is bright and colourful, has a clear message and was easy to read. It helped us to discuss what we take for granted in our life and how we could be more grateful for what we have too.

The illustrations by Kerry Sullivan are great, the style is very friendly and appealing to young children and old with lots of action going on, Harry particularly enjoyed the illustrations of the animals and the children playing football. Every page is jam packed with colour and energy, the characters really stand out.

The book is let down by a lack of punctuation which is very hit and miss, some pages have capital letters and full stops and others have no punctuation at all which does bother me when reading aloud especially. It could use the help of a good editor to just polish off what is a great story.

I was concerned that the book promoted an unhealthy, ideal version of being ‘always good’ however the main character does admit that he does have bad days too, which was a great addition to the story in my opinion because it is hard to be happy all of the time and is an unrealistic expectation to put on yourself or other people but it is possible to always be grateful for what you do have.

Always Good is available now from Shookbop.

Harrison and I think that this book would be great for children who are struggling to see that other people live different lives and have different lifestyles but it doesn’t make your life any less valuable. We all have moments of envy and this book would be a good one to read in those moments.

Awarded 4 out of 5 webs.

Harrison awarded Always Good 4 out of 5 webs, the story is great and the illustrations are beautiful, it just needs some work on the punctuation and grammar.

We were sent this book by Stour Valley Publishing for review, the thoughts and opinions are our own.

Thank you so much for reading our review,

Samantha and Harrison.

Webb Review – Busy Buzzy Bee by Stacy, Anske and Elodie Bax

It is not often that a book is created so beautifully and by a whole family at that. Created by the Bax family and written by mum Stacy Bax, Busy Buzzy Bee is a story that has been created from five year old Elodie’s watercolour paintings. The whole process is really creative and inventive. The mix of the innocence of Elodie’s five year old imagination painting flowers in beautiful colours combined with the parents bees makes it really magical.

Beautiful cover of Busy Buzzy Bee.

The story has some great repetition and tells children just how important bees are and how busy they are making sure that all of their jobs are done. It inspires children to look after the bees and help them as much as possible without getting too scientific and confusing.

The text is great but it is formatted in a confusing way, it could definitely be clearer but it doesn’t take much away from the story all and since it is surrounded by a literal hive of bee activity I can see how it would be difficult to format the text around it.

The back of the bus has a bonus poem and a lovely illustration dedicated to the heroes that are our amazing NHS and all they have accomplished throughout the global pandemic. It is really heartwarming.

Harrison loved the little bees.

I am a big fan of bee books and encouraging children to look after our fluffy little friends as you will know if you have seen my book Blake the Bee Who Believed or the book I illustrated for Simon Henderson, The Soggy Little Bee. It is amazing that all of these bee books can be teaching a similar message and still be amazingly different. Bees really are magical and Busy Buzzy Bee really shows that magic.

Harrison really enjoyed looking at all of the little details in the illustrations, he spent a long time looking at all of the individual bees and deciding on his favourite ones. He really engaged with the illustrations as much as the story. The colours and the beautiful illustrations really do catch your eye.

Harry awarded 5 out of 5 webs.

Busy Buzzy Bee is available now on Shookbop.

This book was sent to us for review by Stour Valley Publishing and the opinions are all our own.

Thank you so much for reading our review,

Samantha and Harrison.

Webb Review – Pencil Case Pals, Peaty Pencil Learns To Help

Written by Tazkia Dokrat and illustrated by Kerry Green, Peaty Pencil Learns To Help is a lovely little book about a pencil who is great at academics and not so great at sports (I can instantly relate!)

The pencils are adorable.

Peaty Pencil has to learn that everyone has strengths and weaknesses and that helping each other really helps everyone. It is a very cute book and the pencils have so much personality. I am a massive stationary addict (Hoarder?) and seeing these little pencils chatting and running is just charming. It is a really cute idea. It isn’t easy to give emotion and movement to inanimate objects and Kerry Green does it really well.

Harry and Peaty Pencil Learns To Help.

The font selection is a little strange as random words throughout the text are given extra emphasis with decorative fonts, it does add to the interest on the text only pages. It is only a short story but is one of a series of Pencil Case Pals and we would be really interested to see the rest too.

We were curious on pages where Peaty Pencil and friends were sat writing with little pencils, did those little pencils have personalities too? That would be super cute but could go on forever.

Harrison gave this book 4 out of 5 webs.

This book was sent to us for review by the publisher Stour Valley Publishing and our opinions are our own.

Available now from Shookbop.

Thank you so much for reading our review,

Samantha and Harrison.

Webb Review – Munchkin’s Adventure by Karen Farrell and Grandma Robyn

If you have ever sat and watched a baby play you can see that their minds are working constantly, figuring out the world around them. In Munchkin’s Adventures you get a glimpse into what Alice (Munchkin) is daydreaming about and her imagination is running wild while she is spending her day with her family doing very ordinary activities.

Beautiful soft watercolours.

Written by Karen Farrell and illustrated by Grandma Robyn, this story is enchanting and so are the illustrations. The imaginary adventures are varied and fun, from a rocket ship to a mermaid lagoon just like on the cover. Harry thought that he could imagine his baby cousins going on all of these fantastic adventures to all of these magical places. Wouldn’t it be amazing if they could really tell us about them all?

The text is simple to follow and it is laid out really nicely, you can see what Alice is really doing and what she is imagining easily which allows the illustrations to shine. They are really delicate and soft watercolours that are perfect for the tone of the gentle story.

Munchkin’s Adventure is a beautiful story.

The cover initially seems very girly, we don’t buy based on gender stereotypes in our home, we just read what we like. Hopefully the pink doesn’t put anyone off though because the story really is great for anyone, boys and girls can daydream of being merpeople and astronauts alike. Harry really enjoyed it and thought that the baby was very sweet.

Munchkin’s Adventures is available now on Shookbop.

The publisher sent us this copy for review and the opinion are all our own.

Thank you for reading our review.

Samantha and Harrison.

Webb Review – Stick It Brit By Jenny Neal

Written and illustrated by Jenny Neal, Stick It Brit is a children’s book that helps to encourage children to learn in their own unique ways.

Stick It Brit was not at all what I was expecting from the title, both Harrison and I thought wrongly that the book would be about Brit giving up or telling someone to leave them alone, perhaps it is a regional dialect thing but saying ‘stick it’ is not the positive message that we soon found this book to be. It was made very clear very fast that the stick which was being referred to was actually sticky notes!

Stick It Brit.

Stick It Brit is the story of a little girl who is struggling to learn spelling and vocabulary and uses sticky notes to help often with hilarious results (have you tried to pop a sticky note on a cat? Brit did!). It was great to see Brit not only recognise her own struggles but to find a way to work through them too. A story of perseverance even when it isn’t easy and that practice will make your tasks easier.

It is a great story that shows not everyone will learn in the same way and that you need to find the way to suit you best.

The illustrations are bright, bold and colourful. I really like the energetic backgrounds on every page, there is not a single page that lets down that energy which carries the enthusiasm throughout the book. It is educational without losing track of the story and would be a great motivator to a child who is struggling to find their own way of learning.

Harrison enjoyed Stick It Brit.

Harry really enjoyed the story too and thought that the idea was brilliant, he suggested that each book should come with a pack of sticky notes to get you started.

Stick It Brit also raises money for Twinkling Stars, Stillbirth Bereavement Services which just makes it even more special.

Harrison awarded Stick It Brit 5 webs out of 5.

Published by Stour Valley Publishing and available now from Shookbop.

This book was sent to us for review and these opinions are our own.

Thank you so much for reading our review.

Samantha and Harrison.

Webb review – Sid the snail has lost his trail by Chloe Helene Harding

Sid The Snail Has Lost His Trail is written by Chloe Helene Harding and illustrated by Marife Gonzales, a picture book written in rhyme that aims to teach children perseverance. Sid gets separated from his mummy in bad weather and has to find his way home alone but it is not an easy journey.

Available from Shookbop.

Harrison and I really enjoyed Sid’s story, it is simple to follow and is full of heart. Sid meets lots of friends on the way and listens to their advice not to give up. I think that children will really relate to Sid, even now I can remember that fear when I was lost as a child (only for a few moments luckily) and the fear of being alone is real. It also shows that Mummy and the whole family never gave up looking for Sid either which I think is a really important part of the story too. The main theme is perseverance and that is exactly what Sid will learn by the end of his journey.

Harrison loves Sid The Snail

The illustrations by Marife Gonzales are absolutely beautiful. A mix of digital and collage with lots of texture. They are bright and impactful and match the tone of the story from page to page. My favourites were the trees, leaves and flowers whereas Harry really loved the characters especially Len the louse. It has a very cheerful overall feel to the story despite some of the darker parts when Sid is scared and lonely.

A great bedtime story.

Sid The Snail Has Lost His Trail made a great bedtime story all snuggled up and ready to sleep. We were very glad that there was a happy ending, a really warm and fuzzy happy ending to Sid’s journey. We would highly recommend this story for your bedtime routine, it was heartwarming and wholesome.

The author, Chloe Helene harding is an advocate of Growth Mindset especially in children and the book includes a great explanation about how helping a child to develop a growth mindset will help them in the future to nurture themselves and the world around them. I believe that this is incredibly important and something that is too often overlooked. Seeing it in the back of the book can be really enlightening to parents and carers, it is in my opinion a great addition. It is a great lesson for adults too and we all need a reminder sometimes.

Stour Valley Publishing are the publishers behind the story and they sent it to us for review and we are very glad that they did, we have really enjoyed getting to know Sid and the world that the author and illustrator have created together. Hopefully it is the first of many.

Harrison awarded 5 out of 5 webs.

Harrison has awarded this book 5 out of 5 webs and has asked if he can read it again soon. I think he will probably enjoy it even more when he isn’t so sleepy too.

You can get your own copy now from Shookbop.

This review is all of our own opinions and is not a paid review.

Thank you so much for reading,

Samantha and Harrison Webb.

Webb Review – Introducing Sherman by Ruth Drury

Introducing Sherman available from Shookbop.

Introducing Sherman is a picture book written and illustrated by children’s author Ruth Drury. As the title suggests, the story introduces Sherman, a character who has a very unique job, he is responsible for the anxious feeling in the pit of our stomachs when we feel ashamed of something we have done or are about to do. Poor Sherman has had enough of his job and wants to retire.

The story is a teaching aid to help children recognise why they might feel ashamed and ways that they might find helpful to stop them feeling bad. Showing that shame is a natural and normal emotion that doesn’t have to linger for long.

Sherman is a complex character that Harrison and I enjoyed discussing. The concept of emotions is a difficult one to portray as a character and Sherman is a good example of it done well. I am not sure that either of my children would of really grasped the concepts that Introducing Sherman was describing when they were 4-7 years (which is the target age for the book) but at 9 years old it started some really deep conversations. I think that if you have a child who is struggling with feelings of self doubt and anxiety then this book could help them to recognise their emotions.

I get the impression from the cover that Sherman is only one of ‘The Shenanigans’ and that we will possibly see more in the future although it doesn’t make it clear in the book so I cannot be sure.

Harry learning about Sherman.

The illustrations are bright and eye catching with a collage feel to them. The character of Sherman is definitely the star of the book and stands out despite being surrounded by an array of other characters, his little red pants are just brilliant. It is a unique style of illustration and I really enjoyed the full pages with lots and lots of detail. There are a few pages where the characters inexplicably have no faces despite all of the other characters having faces which was a little off putting because they didn’t seem to fit with the rest of the illustrations throughout the book. If you are looking for a book absolutely jam packed full of colour then you will enjoy Introducing Sherman and I don’t think it is a style that I have come across before.

Harrys favourite page.

Of course Harrys favourite part was always going to be when a granny shouts ‘BUM!’ It sort of comes out of nowhere and although I didn’t really understand why the granny was shouting or who she was shouting at, Harry didn’t care in the least, he thought it was hilarious and that Sherman should perhaps just make everyone shout ‘BUM!’ all the time and he might not want to retire anymore.

Introducing Sherman is a bright colourful book that will help you start a conversation with your child about the emotion of shame and how to overcome that feeling so that it doesn’t stop them from doing things they enjoy. The vibrant palette and all of the small details in the illustrations elevate the story to make it more fun.

Harry awarded Introducing Sherman 3 out of 5 webs.

Harry has awarded Introducing Sherman 3 out of 5 webs, he did struggle to understand the concept without us talking it through but he really liked Sherman and all of the illustrations. It is not a book that we would read a lot but it is one that will be great to come back to when we need to discuss emotions and we both hope that Sherman is just the first of The Shenanigans.

Harry and Introducing Sherman.

You can learn more about Introducing Sherman and Ruth Drury’s books on Ruth’s website. Or grab your own copy of Introducing Sherman now from Shookbop.

Thank you so much for reading our review,

Samantha and Harrison x

Please note that this book was sent to us for review, this is not a paid review and is completely our own views.

Webb Review – Sydney Spider by Stacy Bax and Anita King

Available now from Shookbop now.

Written by Stacy Bax and illustrated by Anita King, Sydney Spider is a beautiful story about friends coming together to help when all feels lost.

Harrison and I read this book together and he has read it twice more alone since, so I think it is definitely a winner. The illustrations are really beautiful, Anita King has infused so much sweetness and warmth into the main character, Sydney Spider that no one could possibly be scared of this little spider even if you do suffer from arachnophobia.

The story is written in rhyme and flows really well, it has a great rhythm and is spaced well for being read out loud and shared. It is simple to follow and is really kindhearted. It is a wonderful way to teach children to be a bit more respectful of the homes of the creatures that live around us with a focus on leaving spider webs alone.

Merri Mouse was our favourite character.

The characters are all very sweet, we enjoyed the illustrations of the different animals paw prints but were a bit confused about how they followed the footprints because most of the animals are wearing (adorable) boots. It didn’t take anything away from the story though which is honestly enchanting.

From an illustration standpoint I feel like the front cover could have been different, the image is beautiful but it gives away the ending a little prematurely and as we were reading Harrison commented that he “thought that would happen because its on the cover”. The illustrations could also do with being a little sharper but that doesn’t take away from their charm.

Independant reading.

Sydney Spider would be perfect for children who are scared of spiders because it gently introduces them to the fact that spiders are creatures that need protecting too. It is intended for children younger than Harrison and would be great for younger audiences but sometimes its good to remind older children of the importance of looking after creatures smaller than them too and picture books really shouldn’t have an age limit in our opinion. I’m 35 and will never grow out of picture books! It is also great if like me you have a fear of spiders that you don’t want to pass on to your children.

Sydney Spider is published by Stour Valley Publishing who were kind enough to send us this copy for review. We enjoyed it and think you should grab a copy from Shookbop.

Harrison awarded Sydney Spider 5 webs out of 5.

Now we may be biased because the story is about a web but Harrison has awarded Sydney Spider 5 out of 5 webs and we are both looking forward to reading more stories by Stacy Bax and seeing more of Anita King’s illustrations.

Thank you for reading,

Samantha and Harrison x